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Current listening_evaluation room acoustics (Read 17967 times)
RFZ_Quest
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Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
11/11/08 at 14:21:21
 
The current view from my listening position, as this great experiment in acoustical control advances.



Unlocking the secrets of premium sound one step at a time.
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #1 - 11/11/08 at 14:23:41
 
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #2 - 11/11/08 at 14:28:03
 


left side of room with basic prime 13 diffusers.
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #3 - 11/11/08 at 14:29:59
 


Left side of room full view with absorber unit above fireplace.
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #4 - 11/11/08 at 14:33:13
 


The right side of the room with broadband absorbtion units mounted on the wall.
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #5 - 11/11/08 at 14:48:57
 
The back wall directly behind my listening position..


My latest design and build. This is a Quad grouping of single sequence Prime 23-Hybred-Diffusion/Absorption modules. The platform they rest on is built airtight from 3/4 MDF and sectionalized.

These units are designed at full broadband specifications for maximum performance, with a depth of 18 inches @ a well width of .5 in a two dimensional pattern.

These units are extremely heavy and had to be assembled in position due to the weight. With the bass trap platform plus the four units, I estimate the weight to be somewhere around 800+ pounds!

All wells are filled with Celetex absorption panels to fill the cavities behind each well depth.

Attention to detail focuses upon the reduction of 'lobing' which is a result of repetitive sequences. This is corrected by reducing the "ZERO" or end wells to one-half of the specified well width used in the diffuser design.
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #6 - 11/11/08 at 14:51:19
 
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #7 - 11/11/08 at 14:55:08
 


Close up view of prime 23 'single-sequence'.
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #8 - 11/11/08 at 15:02:26
 


D.I.Y. radius design 'Binary-Residue-Remainder' diffusion modules with semi-rigid absorption material mounted directly to the panel rear. These have an internal airspace with a backplate of airtight Celetex.

These are the big guns when it comes to diffusion control.
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Steve Deckert
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #9 - 11/12/08 at 02:09:19
 
RFZ_Quest,

Nice pics and job well done!!!  I wish everyone would go to so much trouble... the world would literally be a better sounding place!  Oh sure, the wife factor, but then 50% of us statistically will get divorced from our first marriage so that gives 1/2 of all men a fair chance at room treatment.  ;)

I'm fascinated by the diffuser you built on your back wall...  I crunched some numbers using the same math that created our diffusers to see what it would take to have an 18 inch well depth with 1/2" spacing and came up with the following single diffuser:
This is a single unit 72 inches wide and 72 inches high.

Well Number 0   WellDepth = 0 inches          Proportionality Factor = 0
Well Number 1   WellDepth = 0.1313869 inches  Proportionality Factor = 1
Well Number 2   WellDepth = 0.5255474 inches  Proportionality Factor = 4
Well Number 3   WellDepth = 1.182482 inches   Proportionality Factor = 9
Well Number 4   WellDepth = 2.10219 inches    Proportionality Factor = 16
Well Number 5   WellDepth = 3.284672 inches   Proportionality Factor = 25
Well Number 6   WellDepth = 4.729927 inches   Proportionality Factor = 36
Well Number 7   WellDepth = 6.437956 inches   Proportionality Factor = 49
Well Number 8   WellDepth = 8.408759 inches   Proportionality Factor = 64
Well Number 9   WellDepth = 10.64234 inches   Proportionality Factor = 81
Well Number 10   WellDepth = 13.13869 inches  Proportionality Factor = 100
Well Number 11   WellDepth = 15.89781 inches  Proportionality Factor = 121
Well Number 12   WellDepth = 0.6569343 inches Proportionality Factor = 5
Well Number 13   WellDepth = 3.941606 inches  Proportionality Factor = 30
Well Number 14   WellDepth = 7.489051 inches  Proportionality Factor = 57
Well Number 15   WellDepth = 11.29927 inches  Proportionality Factor = 86
Well Number 16   WellDepth = 15.37226 inches  Proportionality Factor = 117
Well Number 17   WellDepth = 1.445256 inches  Proportionality Factor = 11
Well Number 18   WellDepth = 6.043796 inches  Proportionality Factor = 46
Well Number 19   WellDepth = 10.90511 inches  Proportionality Factor = 83
Well Number 20   WellDepth = 16.0292 inches   Proportionality Factor = 122
Well Number 21   WellDepth = 3.153285 inches  Proportionality Factor = 24
Well Number 22   WellDepth = 8.80292 inches   Proportionality Factor = 67
Well Number 23   WellDepth = 14.71533 inches  Proportionality Factor = 112
Well Number 24   WellDepth = 2.627737 inches  Proportionality Factor = 20
Well Number 25   WellDepth = 9.065694 inches  Proportionality Factor = 69
Well Number 26   WellDepth = 15.76642 inches  Proportionality Factor = 120
Well Number 27   WellDepth = 4.467154 inches  Proportionality Factor = 34
Well Number 28   WellDepth = 11.69343 inches  Proportionality Factor = 89
Well Number 29   WellDepth = 0.9197081 inches Proportionality Factor = 7
Well Number 30   WellDepth = 8.671533 inches  Proportionality Factor = 66
Well Number 31   WellDepth = 16.68613 inches  Proportionality Factor = 127
Well Number 32   WellDepth = 6.70073 inches   Proportionality Factor = 51
Well Number 33   WellDepth = 15.24088 inches  Proportionality Factor = 116
Well Number 34   WellDepth = 5.781022 inches  Proportionality Factor = 44
Well Number 35   WellDepth = 14.84672 inches  Proportionality Factor = 113
Well Number 36   WellDepth = 5.912409 inches  Proportionality Factor = 45
Well Number 37   WellDepth = 15.50365 inches  Proportionality Factor = 118
Well Number 38   WellDepth = 7.094891 inches  Proportionality Factor = 54
Well Number 39   WellDepth = 17.21168 inches  Proportionality Factor = 131
Well Number 40   WellDepth = 9.328467 inches  Proportionality Factor = 71
Well Number 41   WellDepth = 1.708029 inches  Proportionality Factor = 13
Well Number 42   WellDepth = 12.61314 inches  Proportionality Factor = 96
Well Number 43   WellDepth = 5.518249 inches  Proportionality Factor = 42
Well Number 44   WellDepth = 16.94891 inches  Proportionality Factor = 129
Well Number 45   WellDepth = 10.37956 inches  Proportionality Factor = 79
Well Number 46   WellDepth = 4.072993 inches  Proportionality Factor = 31
Well Number 47   WellDepth = 16.29197 inches  Proportionality Factor = 124
Well Number 48   WellDepth = 10.51095 inches  Proportionality Factor = 80
Well Number 49   WellDepth = 4.992701 inches  Proportionality Factor = 38
Well Number 50   WellDepth = 18 inches        Proportionality Factor = 137
Well Number 51   WellDepth = 13.0073 inches   Proportionality Factor = 99
Well Number 52   WellDepth = 8.277372 inches  Proportionality Factor = 63
Well Number 53   WellDepth = 3.810219 inches  Proportionality Factor = 29
Well Number 54   WellDepth = 17.86861 inches  Proportionality Factor = 136
Well Number 55   WellDepth = 13.92701 inches  Proportionality Factor = 106
Well Number 56   WellDepth = 10.24818 inches  Proportionality Factor = 78
Well Number 57   WellDepth = 6.832117 inches  Proportionality Factor = 52
Well Number 58   WellDepth = 3.678832 inches  Proportionality Factor = 28
Well Number 59   WellDepth = 0.7883212 inches Proportionality Factor = 6
Well Number 60   WellDepth = 16.42336 inches  Proportionality Factor = 125
Well Number 61   WellDepth = 14.05839 inches  Proportionality Factor = 107
Well Number 62   WellDepth = 11.95621 inches  Proportionality Factor = 91
Well Number 63   WellDepth = 10.11679 inches  Proportionality Factor = 77
Well Number 64   WellDepth = 8.540146 inches  Proportionality Factor = 65
Well Number 65   WellDepth = 7.226277 inches  Proportionality Factor = 55
Well Number 66   WellDepth = 6.175182 inches  Proportionality Factor = 47
Well Number 67   WellDepth = 5.386861 inches  Proportionality Factor = 41
Well Number 68   WellDepth = 4.861314 inches  Proportionality Factor = 37
Well Number 69   WellDepth = 4.59854 inches   Proportionality Factor = 35
Well Number 70   WellDepth = 4.59854 inches   Proportionality Factor = 35
Well Number 71   WellDepth = 4.861314 inches  Proportionality Factor = 37
Well Number 72   WellDepth = 5.386861 inches  Proportionality Factor = 41
Well Number 73   WellDepth = 6.175182 inches  Proportionality Factor = 47
Well Number 74   WellDepth = 7.226277 inches  Proportionality Factor = 55
Well Number 75   WellDepth = 8.540146 inches  Proportionality Factor = 65
Well Number 76   WellDepth = 10.11679 inches  Proportionality Factor = 77
Well Number 77   WellDepth = 11.95621 inches  Proportionality Factor = 91
Well Number 78   WellDepth = 14.05839 inches  Proportionality Factor = 107
Well Number 79   WellDepth = 16.42336 inches  Proportionality Factor = 125
Well Number 80   WellDepth = 0.7883212 inches Proportionality Factor = 6
Well Number 81   WellDepth = 3.678832 inches  Proportionality Factor = 28
Well Number 82   WellDepth = 6.832117 inches  Proportionality Factor = 52
Well Number 83   WellDepth = 10.24818 inches  Proportionality Factor = 78
Well Number 84   WellDepth = 13.92701 inches  Proportionality Factor = 106
Well Number 85   WellDepth = 17.86861 inches  Proportionality Factor = 136
Well Number 86   WellDepth = 3.810219 inches  Proportionality Factor = 29
Well Number 87   WellDepth = 8.277372 inches  Proportionality Factor = 63
Well Number 88   WellDepth = 13.0073 inches   Proportionality Factor = 99
Well Number 89   WellDepth = 18 inches        Proportionality Factor = 137
Well Number 90   WellDepth = 4.992701 inches  Proportionality Factor = 38
Well Number 91   WellDepth = 10.51095 inches  Proportionality Factor = 80
Well Number 92   WellDepth = 16.29197 inches  Proportionality Factor = 124
Well Number 93   WellDepth = 4.072993 inches  Proportionality Factor = 31
Well Number 94   WellDepth = 10.37956 inches  Proportionality Factor = 79
Well Number 95   WellDepth = 16.94891 inches  Proportionality Factor = 129
Well Number 96   WellDepth = 5.518249 inches  Proportionality Factor = 42
Well Number 97   WellDepth = 12.61314 inches  Proportionality Factor = 96
Well Number 98   WellDepth = 1.708029 inches  Proportionality Factor = 13
Well Number 99   WellDepth = 9.328467 inches  Proportionality Factor = 71
Well Number 100   WellDepth = 17.21168 inches  Proportionality Factor = 131
Well Number 101   WellDepth = 7.094891 inches  Proportionality Factor = 54
Well Number 102   WellDepth = 15.50365 inches  Proportionality Factor = 118
Well Number 103   WellDepth = 5.912409 inches  Proportionality Factor = 45
Well Number 104   WellDepth = 14.84672 inches  Proportionality Factor = 113
Well Number 105   WellDepth = 5.781022 inches  Proportionality Factor = 44
Well Number 106   WellDepth = 15.24088 inches  Proportionality Factor = 116
Well Number 107   WellDepth = 6.70073 inches   Proportionality Factor = 51
Well Number 108   WellDepth = 16.68613 inches  Proportionality Factor = 127
Well Number 109   WellDepth = 8.671533 inches  Proportionality Factor = 66
Well Number 110   WellDepth = 0.9197081 inches Proportionality Factor = 7
Well Number 111   WellDepth = 11.69343 inches  Proportionality Factor = 89
Well Number 112   WellDepth = 4.467154 inches  Proportionality Factor = 34
Well Number 113   WellDepth = 15.76642 inches  Proportionality Factor = 120
Well Number 114   WellDepth = 9.065694 inches  Proportionality Factor = 69
Well Number 115   WellDepth = 2.627737 inches  Proportionality Factor = 20
Well Number 116   WellDepth = 14.71533 inches  Proportionality Factor = 112
Well Number 117   WellDepth = 8.80292 inches   Proportionality Factor = 67
Well Number 118   WellDepth = 3.153285 inches  Proportionality Factor = 24
Well Number 119   WellDepth = 16.0292 inches   Proportionality Factor = 122
Well Number 120   WellDepth = 10.90511 inches  Proportionality Factor = 83
Well Number 121   WellDepth = 6.043796 inches  Proportionality Factor = 46
Well Number 122   WellDepth = 1.445256 inches  Proportionality Factor = 11
Well Number 123   WellDepth = 15.37226 inches  Proportionality Factor = 117
Well Number 124   WellDepth = 11.29927 inches  Proportionality Factor = 86
Well Number 125   WellDepth = 7.489051 inches  Proportionality Factor = 57
Well Number 126   WellDepth = 3.941606 inches  Proportionality Factor = 30
Well Number 127   WellDepth = 0.6569343 inches Proportionality Factor = 5
Well Number 128   WellDepth = 15.89781 inches  Proportionality Factor = 121
Well Number 129   WellDepth = 13.13869 inches  Proportionality Factor = 100
Well Number 130   WellDepth = 10.64234 inches  Proportionality Factor = 81
Well Number 131   WellDepth = 8.408759 inches  Proportionality Factor = 64
Well Number 132   WellDepth = 6.437956 inches  Proportionality Factor = 49
Well Number 133   WellDepth = 4.729927 inches  Proportionality Factor = 36
Well Number 134   WellDepth = 3.284672 inches  Proportionality Factor = 25
Well Number 135   WellDepth = 2.10219 inches   Proportionality Factor = 16
Well Number 136   WellDepth = 1.182482 inches  Proportionality Factor = 9
Well Number 137   WellDepth = 0.5255474 inches Proportionality Factor = 4
Well Number 138   WellDepth = 0.1313869 inches Proportionality Factor = 1
Well Number 139   WellDepth = 0 inches         Proportionality Factor = 0

Diffuser Depth = 18 inches
Diffuser Width (= Height) = 72 inches
Well Width = 0.5 inches

Thought you might find it interesting and someone wanting to build a unit this size now has the dimensions without having to do the math!

Steve
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« Last Edit: 11/12/08 at 02:12:58 by Steve Deckert »  
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #10 - 11/12/08 at 18:59:32
 
Thanks Steve.

I do find this concept to be quite interesting and very feasible concerning construction.  I will most likely build this unit just to put it to test and see how it compares. I have also just finished the plans for a large single-sequence prime-19 module with a 2.25 inch well width @ a maximum depth of 4.5".  These are reduced to the smallest size possible with as wide of coverage as possible to maintain reasonable weight and cost factors. I am planning to build four of these units in the near future but I may try your idea first and then build the p19 units at a later time.

If I were to design a unit based on your figures for commercial resale, it would require a prefab-sectioned concept where the unit is divided into manageable sections and easily rejoined at the consumer end with basic hand tools.

A total kit form where all parts are cut to spec, ready for assembly,  packaged into parts groups, could also be possible for those who are willing to pay the shipping cost and do not want the hassle of building something on this level themselves. The sections could be un-boxed and re-joined together quickly and effortlessly with very little difficulty.

My current set-up is experimental at the moment. However, this type of arrangement has proven to excel dramatically over any other approach for which I've experienced.

The digital diffusers which have a poly-face radius to them, perform incredibly well with a very noticeable difference. The combination absorption factors built into these units is a major aspect which covers the majority of required room absorption without directly contributing to any over-reduction of the frequency balance. There is 3 inches of semi-rigid material with a 5 pound density rating used in each of these units.

There are just short of ten 4 x 8 ft sheets of Celetex used within the prime 23 modules alone! This should give some idea as to the absorption coefficients that are obtained throughout the room.  The additional units mounted on the wall simply rounded everything into perspective concerning frequency balance.

I am currently experiencing the widest, deepest sound-stage that I've heard to date, without the use of external electronics or complicated software programs to produce this type of phantom imaging.

The ambiance reveals a very special quality to it that is difficult to describe and must be experienced to fully understand just what a dramatic improvement this has made. I am hearing a new level of depth into the music with detail that has escaped me in the past. This all by using identical equipment and sound media, so the only real change here is the actual listening elements.

If anyone needs positive proof of what diffusion does for your listening experience, I feel quite confident that this type of approach will easily provide confirmation with a radical departure from the ordinary. I am sure about one thing, music will never be the same without it.
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Steve Deckert
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #11 - 11/13/08 at 01:48:11
 
It's not my idea, nor my math...  just simple quadratic formula as far as I know.  By my calculator, the sequence I listed is the only way it calculates correctly to achieve a 1/2 inch well spacing with an 18 inch depth.   FWIW, that is the frustrating part of quadratic residue diffusers, in that you can't decide you want a unit of a given size to handle a given band of frequencies.  You can decide how low you want it to work, how high you want it to work, or how big you want the face of the unit to be (width=height), but only two of the three.  

For example, the 72 inch unit I listed diffuses frequencies between 187Hz and 18000Hz.  It has an 18 inch well depth with 1/2 inch spacing.

If I decided to make the unit 48 inches then the well depth changes to 12 inches and the unit diffuses between 281Hz and 18000Hz.

If I decided to make the spacing 1 inch instead of 1/2 inch then the high frequency drops to 9000Hz.

Now suppose I am happy with 9000Hz but I would like it to go lower than 281Hz so I decide to change the well depth from 12 inches back to 18 inches.   The math crashes and burns instantly.  The only way I can get it to work is to increase the unit size from 48 inches back to 72 inches.

Of course you have to wonder what would happen if you did it anyway.  My guess is that the well depth compared to the sequence would create a sporadic result where rather than creating an evenly spaced hemi-disk of reflection across all frequencies, you would be creating multiple sub sequences with some frequencies actually amplified and others actually absorbed or muted. (not to mention the rather wild lobing that would likely take place) Nevertheless, if you had enough units covering a large space and you were perhaps twice as far away, like in a concert hall, this could still work.

I have figured out over time that the idea that a quadratic residue diffuser does not create a smooth hemi-disk until you're a great distance away from it, such as 10 or 20 feet is true.  Closer than that and the benefit is mostly from scattering reflections rather than diffusion.  

The direction I have been working in over the past year, of which you have one of the prototypes I believe, is near field treatments that would do a superior job of scattering vs. QRD at distances of 12 inches on out so that audiophiles could use them in smallish listening spaces like those found in most homes.

This unit would probably already be in production if it weren't so time consuming to build, but here is a couple illustrations I did:



In these illustrations I used light to represent a sound source, such as a loudspeaker.  This one shows the unit on a wall about 10 feet away from the sound source that is just below the unit.  The light and shadow shows me what parts of the unit will be reflecting sound from any given angle of incidence.



This one shows what happens when the sound source is nearly point blank minus about 5 degrees vertical.  Can you see the sphere effect?  This is what impresses me most about this design, and proudly I can claim this as my own sequence.  I'm looking forward to measuring it with the mics some day.  I say some day, because I'll have to make another one before I can do it.  The prototype I gave to you and Ziggy  has the very top (or bottom) row botched.  When you're as dyslexic as I am it's a lot harder to glue all these tubes in without making a mistake than you might think!

Anyway, I thought it wouldn't hurt to get a little discussion going about room acoustics in this forum because the average audiophile simply isn't going to give room treatment enough weight in his or her overall system design unless it begins to receive equal billing with all the other forum topics.

Steve  ::)
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RFZ_Quest
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #12 - 11/13/08 at 20:52:03
 
Steve,

There is always going to be some sort of compromise when it comes to design and set-up for something like this. Unfortunately, without an anechoic chamber and the proper gear to run accurate test analysis for these changes, we can at best, use math to give us a predetermined  idea within a certain degree of the performance curve.

It just becomes a trial and error scenario from that point where careful listening evaluations will be the best form of analysis. I think we have always found that what we actually hear is what really matters anyway, over that obtained from test equipment.

The nice thing about the equipment is that actual data can be produced with relative accuracy, showing what the unit actually does rather than just estimating a value based on the numbers. If the units conform to known values, then we can also maintain a predictable value for it's overall performance.

I will stand behind the following. The only thing that matters in the end is how the changes are audibly perceived. I think that it is fair to say that any type of diffusion is better than none at all, although there can and most likely will be a radical difference in how they respond by their design.

I would say that if a unit of 72 inch square size can effectively cover a range that wide, which I know the math predicts this, then it is covering the vast majority of critical frequencies to the extent of where it makes the most difference anyway. A couple of these units placed strategically within the room along with adequate absorption, would most definitely transform the rooms response to a much more favorable quality factor.

This would be like 'doubling' the surrounding space which is perceived audibly by the listener. It would also be like having a major upgrade to the audio system itself. The one thing that I think is overlooked by most people, therefore reducing the relevance of diffusion properties, is the overall value that this provides to the total systems worth in general.

I know how in-depth your experience runs with room acoustics, so I know that you can easily predict what my results are.

For the typical person who has never experienced acoustical correction and the rewarding results obtained from it (most people), it is very difficult for them to formulate in their mind what this really does and how important it actually is to the quality of music.

Until they physically experience the radical transformation that takes place, the power of diffusion will most likely never be understood for it's value and passed off as an afterthought. It is their misfortune  to do so. I can only hope that one day, the light of knowledge will convince these people to focus on this aspect with utmost priority.

One thing to think about. I have a great deal of experience with the equipment and source material in my system, along with many various room set-ups of various acoustical measurements. The one constant that remains, is that every room with it's own set of parameters, is unique in overall response and quality factors.  It is probable that no two rooms will ever sound remotely alike, even when all equipment, set up parameters, and source material remains constant.

It is safe to predict that every owner of a particular amplifier for instance, will have a unique experience and perspective from one owner's room to another. I doubt that any two listeners have heard the sound of that amplifier exactly the same, no more likely than sharing similarities of their fingerprints. To make that possible, both would have to listen in the same room for one to understand exactly what the other hears.

Through the art of acoustical design, it is very possible to alter any room for which to custom tailor the sound to taste, or to present a better chance of cloning another room's sound quality.  

Without corrective measures, the sound is only ever going to be as good as the room allows. In most cases, unless the room was built specifically for optimum acoustical properties, the pending sound quality will cripple the sound of music. What this means is that one will never know the true potential of their gear or how good the speakers actually are, until conditions are right to expose this.

Why would one bother to upgrade his equipment when the most critical factor has been overlooked for lack of it's significance within the listeners mind?

In this case, it is the unseen fiber for which the threads of a musical canvas can be sewn. The key ingredient to quality sound is that of diffusion with absorption supplementing it's overall effectiveness.

I've proven this to myself many times over and always with favorable results. I simply would not listen to my system
without these treatments in place. I have before and it wasn't a pleasant experience. The better option was to just box the equipment back up with the realization that any attempt to hearing a quality musical experience was simply futile without proper room treatments.

Most every problem that I've had with sound quality was generally corrected with acoustical treatments of some sort.

It all comes down to this; don't bother upgrading a system until that system has been truly exposed for it's current quality.  I would bet that the typical system has rarely been heard for it's real capability and quality factor, simply because the room conditions have prevented it.

One would be surprised as to how much upgrade value there really is lurking within the present system without having to replace or alter what is already in place concerning the equipment. Again, the answer lies within the room's condition with far more relevance than the system itself.

Now, as far as the prototype diffusion principal is concerned, I have put some thought into this from a production standpoint. I had to wrap my mind around the design layout and try to predict what was possible from this particular outcome.  

As I viewed it's form, the closest formula that I could relate to it was that of an inverted prime 13 sequence with some sort of variable offsets at the outer well placement. This confused my reasoning to make sense of this form, so I put it off for now.

I am now visualizing the possibility of what can be predicted from this innovative concept in diffusion.

I have in my mind, an alternate method for constructing this module which should provide the same degree of effect, which means that dealing with a bunch of staggered tube placement does not necessarily have to be used to pull it off.

I do not think that a open forum is appropriate for discussing possible trade secrets on something under development here, so I will not disclose any more information here concerning this design.

I will say that my take on this would be of hybrid design which takes full advantage of absorption as the principal behind the diffusion coefficients. I could be wrong about this idea, but then again, I have not had a chance to put any real effort into it.

Please get a hold of me at the shop or PM my box and we can discuss this.  I just have not had the time to do anything with it yet as the new speaker projects are of the highest concern at this point.

If you would like all the parts cut to spec for your other 72" concept and sent to you for assembly at your end so that you may personally evaluate it's performance, I will calculate the material needed and the cost for that material.

As you can imagine, there will be a considerable amount of labor hours involved in creating these kit parts plus packaging them up for shipment. The parts would have to be shipped in several boxes due to weight and size, so this would be fairly costly to ship.

I will provide the labor for free to do this on this one unit, but I would need an advance payment for the material. Shipping cost would also be your responsibility.

If you are not interested, that's fine. Just thought I'd make the offer in case a unit like this has peaked your curiosity for development.

In the mean time, I will continue to keep your new concept on mind as I have not forgotten about it.

Paul.

BTW: this offer only extends to Steve in case anyone else was wondering.
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #13 - 11/13/08 at 23:20:55
 
Then we should not be reading this?
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Re: Current listening_evaluation room acoustics
Reply #14 - 11/14/08 at 07:50:12
 
Maybe we should not be reading this but the concept at this point is quite interesting to me and I will reread this to see what I can understand about doing the same thing for my room. Steve's math is really helpful and I am a professional woodworker so maybe......... I am glad I read it. Thanks Paul and Steve for further enlightenment on the room treatment issue. 18 sheets eh.........
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